Reina Mikame

Painting

Looking at the line

I depict the manner by which I discern the lines from within the landscape. Inspired from my encountering a landscape in which I saw a line of light extend slightly above the horizon, I attempted to transcribe this scene into the “relationship” within painting. For example, when gazing at the ocean, rather than the horizon that appears too smooth a line, one is made aware of the presence of lines through the band of clouds that extend above it. To find a line means to adjust one’s focus, to try to understand the landscape, and further adjust the units of things in the field of one’s vision the extent that one can understand.

“Looking at the line”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 cm,
Price: JPY 80,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the line ”, 2019, Oil on canvas, 38 x 45.5 cm,
Price: JPY 200,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the line”, 2018, Oil on canvas, 32 x 41 cm,
Price: JPY 180,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the line”, 2018, Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 cm,
Price: JPY 160,000. (tax excl.)


The distance of light

It is possible to measure distance through the colors that emerge from the light. One may also recognize the landscape that extends before one’s eyes as well as and the sense of distance between objects by color. While disassembling the way one looks at shadows and perspective, expressing distance through differences in color, one at same time does not let go of the realization that color is created by light, which is also a crystallization of various elements in that precise moment.

  • “Distance of the light”, 2017, Oil on canvas, 324 x 130 cm,
    Price: JPY 1,400,000. (tax excl.)


Looking at the color

One day I picked up a red fruit and carried it around with me. It was a bright sunny day, and every time I walked from the shade into the sunlight, its color seemed to change. Dark red, bright red, dark red, bright red… How would it be possible to look at a neutral red –a neutral color– that is neither dark nor bright? When confronting an object, one tries to understand it by compensating the whole after having seen its section. A single red fruit harbors a multitude of elements, and the color of some part of it constitutes the perception of whole. Humidity, scent, sunlight, and diffused reflection. To what extent is it possible to incorporate information into color?

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 cm,
Price: JPY 80,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 cm ,
Price: JPY 80,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 24.2 x 33.3 cm ,
Price: JPY 160,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 27.3 x 22 cm,
Price: JPY 140,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 cm,
Price: JPY 80,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 cm,
Price: JPY 80,000. (tax excl.)

“Looking at the color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 18 x 14 cm,
Price: JPY 80,000. (tax excl.)


Weaving color

If “Looking at the color” means to depict parts where the color is actually visible, then “Weaving color” is to recognize how the colors one is looking at are made, applying the paint so as to weave the colors one step before setting eyes on them. One attempts to look at color cognitively. In response to the colors that are faintly visible, one deconstructs the reason for why it can be observed. Such is reconstructed until it becomes visible again.

“Weaving color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 38 cm,
Price: JPY 200,000 . (tax excl.)

“Weaving color”, 2020, Oil on canvas, 27.5 x 22 cm,
Price: JPY 140,000 . (tax excl.)